Volunteers for Wildlife is changing its name to Wildlife Center of Long Island!
Baby Season Raffle!
Wildlife Hotline: (516) 674-0982
Wildlife Center of Long Island
Wildlife Hotline: (516) 674-0982

December 2022

What's new at the center

Hawk

We Moved!

Our time in Locust Valley was a period of tremendous growth for our organization and we outgrew our old home. We are currently in negotiations for a new long term home for our organization. While moving is always bittersweet, we are very excited for the future to come!

In the meantime, we continue to serve Long Island’s wildlife and citizens throughout our transition. We are presently operating our rehabilitation hospital in interim space in Huntington. Our ambassador animals have settled in beautifully to their new enclosures. While we cannot accommodate visitors at this time, we continue our education programming throughout Long Island.

Our contact phone and email remain the same. We can be reached at 516-674-0982 or [email protected]

Thank you for your continued support!

Patient Spotlight

Gulls Galore

Gulls Galore!

Every winter, our Hospital admits a large number of gulls! Often nicknamed seagulls because of their tendency to be found by the ocean, these highly adaptable birds are commonly found in different areas all over Long Island. The most frequent species of gulls admitted into care are Laughing Gulls, Ring-billed Gulls (pictured above), Herring Gulls, and Great Black-backed Gulls.

Gulls are opportunistic feeders. They will eat almost anything! Their varied diet consists of fish, clam, oysters, insects, bird eggs, small birds, small rodents, and, of course, human food!

Gulls Diet
Gull patient diet

Most gulls are admitted to our Hospital after they’ve been hit by cars. For some, their delicate bones are shattered beyond repair and humane euthanasia is the kindest thing we can do. For others, if the bone is not too severely fractured, rehabilitation is possible. Based on the location and severity of the fracture, repair may be done by placing a secure wrap on the limb to immobilize it and keep the bones in proper alignment. Sometimes surgical repair is needed by placing pins inside the bone to hold alignment during the healing process. The amazing veterinary team at Animal General of East Norwich recently performed surgery to repair a broken wing on a current Herring Gull patient (see below). Gulls with fractured bones require at least 4 weeks of healing and then 2 weeks of physical therapy prior to release.

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Intake x-rays for Herring Gull patient. There is a fracture to the right radius & humerus (wing bones).
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Post-surgery x-rays for same Herring Gull patient. The humerus fracture has been stabilized with a surgical pin. The radius fracture will heal with proper bandaging.

The other main cause of admission for gulls to our Hospital is entanglement with fishing line & fishing hooks. Fish hooks are often barbed and rusty–making it difficult to remove from the bird and highly likely for an infection at the puncture site. Gulls injured by fishing hooks need at least 1-2 weeks of pain medication and antibiotics while receiving wound treatment. Fishing line also presents a huge threat to gulls (and other wildlife). Whenever you are outside, you can help by picking up and throwing away fishing gear, balloons, and any other litter.

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Herring Gull found hanging in a tree by fishing line wrapped around his wing.
Current patient–expected to make a full recovery!

Please consider supporting the care of gulls by donating a supply item from our Amazon Wish List or making a monetary donation today!

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Stay up to date about the latest news & upcoming events 

Whats new at the center

November 2023

Ambassador Calendars!
Patient Feature: Hawk Crashes through Window

Whats new at the center

October 2023

We Changed Our Name!
Patient Feature: Oiled Geese Rescued

Whats new at the center

September 2023

Annual Wildlife Walk
Patient Feature: Rabbit Rescued from Netting

Whats new at the center

August 2023

Wildlife Walk Fundraiser
Patient Feature: Fox Kit Recovers from Mange

Whats new at the center

July 2023

Walk Registration Is Open!
Patient Feature: Young Herons Rescued

Whats new at the center

June 2023

Turtles on the Move!
Patient Feature: Baby Goose & Diamondback Terrapin